Discovering knowledge to effectively integrate humans and systems

ABOUT

NVH HSI, LLC is a multi-disciplinary firm specializing in basic and engineering research, and in product design and development.  We utilize system thinking, human-centered design, and information technologies to effectively integrate humans and systems in several domains, including aviation, healthcare, environmental monitoring, and education.

We offer our clients quality and exceptional services by incorporating systems engineering processes and multidisciplinary thinking in all our work; assisting clients in all phases of a basic or engineering research project (from question formulation to publication) and of a product development project (from product conception to design, implementation, and operation); forming integrated product teamwork with clients and offering onsite support; and working with clients’ inter-departments (e.g., marketing to engineering) and transferring our skills and knowledge to clients.

TEAM

Nhut T. Ho

President

President of NVH Human Systems Integration, a company that specializes in developing theory and methods to effectively integrate humans and technologies. His interests and projects include autonomy, human trust in artificial intelligence-based systems, modeling, and principles for the design of transparent human–automation teamwork systems. He also conducts case and field studies of operators’ acceptance and trust in fielded, complex systems. He obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Garrett G. Sadler

Human Factors Researcher

He studies the role human trust plays in human–machine interaction, automation transparency, and interface design. Collaborating with NASA and Air Force Research Laboratory, he conducts research utilizing a diverse range of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. He received a B.S. in Mathematics (“pure” math emphasis) in 2008 and an M.A. in Anthropology (cultural) in 2014.

Lauren C. Hoffmann

Human Factors Researcher

Woking in collaboration with the Human Autonomy Teaming Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and her Master’s degree in Experimental Psychology, her research focusing on the interplay of cognition and emotion on prefrontal cortex decision-making. Lauren taught undergraduate statistics, and has experience designing experimental research employing quantitative methods. Her research focuses on applied human factors engineering problems, and she uses cognitive psychology paired with quantitative and qualitative methods to inform research in human–machine interaction.

Vicky N. Ho

Office Manager

As Office Manager of NVH Human Systems Integration LLC, Vicky is tasked with ensuring that the office runs smoothly. Her daily responsibilities currently include all aspects of Human Resources (HR), Finance, Accounting, Legal, and General Administration. Prior to joining NVH Human Systems Integration LLC, Vicky’s career included Senior Researcher at Savills Vietnam, Revenue Manager at Sheraton Saigon Hotel and Towers, staff auditor at Ernst & Young Vietnam. Vicky holds a Master’s degree in Business Administration from California State University, Northridge, a second Bachelor’s degree in Accounting from California State University, Sacramento, and a Bachelor’s degree in International Business from Foreign Trade University, Vietnam.

SERVICES

BASIC/ENGINEERING RESEARCH

Work with clients in all phases of a scientific research project

IDENTIFY

Identify funders,write and submit white papers/proposals

SYNTHESIZE

Synthesize research questions and hypotheses

FORMULATE

Formulate research design and procedures: human-in-the-loop experimentation/simulation, case studies, surveys, observations, interviews/focus groups

ANALYZE

Process and analyze

PUBLICATION

Prepare publications (journals/conference/reports)

PRODUCT DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT

Work with clients in all phases of product design and development

CONCEIVE

Opportunity identification |  Product planning and specifications | Customer needs

CONCEPTUALIZE

Concept generation | Risk management | Cognitive task, behavior, and scenario-based analyses |  Write and integrate requirements

DESIGN

Hardware and software design | CAD/CAM designs | Interactive interface wireframes and mockups

IMPLEMENT

Iterative and rapid prototyping | Software and hardware implementation | Usability testing and stress tests

OPERATE

Support product launch | Training | Documentation

PRODUCT DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT

Work with clients in all phases of product design and development

  • Conceive: Opportunity identification |  Product planning and specifications | Customer needs
  • Conceptualize: Concept generation, selection, and testing | Use cases for safety assurance, risk management, and operational concepts | Cognitive task, behavior, and scenario-based analyses |  Write and integrate requirements
  • Design: Hardware and software architecture design | CAD/CAM designs | Interactive interface wireframes and mockups | Designs for manufacturing, environment, robustness
  • Implement: Iterative and rapid prototyping | Software and hardware implementation | Usability testing and stress tests
  • Operate: Support product launch | Training | Documentation
Conceive
  • Opportunity identification
  • Product planning and specifications
  • Customer needs
Design
  • Concept generation, selection, and testing
  • Use cases for safety assurance, risk management, and operational concepts
  • Cognitive task, behavior, and scenario-based analyses
  • Write and integrate requirements
  • Hardware and software architecture design
  • CAD/CAM designs
  • Interactive interface wireframes and mockups
  • Designs for manufacturing, environment, robustness
Implement
  • Iterative and rapid prototyping
  • Software and hardware implementation
  • Usability testing and stress tests
Operate
  • Support product launch
  • Training
  • Documentation

CLIENTS

  • Ames Research Center
  • NASA
  • SERL
  • CSUN
  • U.S. Air force
  • Air Force Flight Test Center
  • Air Force Research Laboratory

AREAS OF EXPERTISE

HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

ARTIFICAL INTELLIGENCE

AUTOMATION

AVIATION

PROJECTS

Field Study of the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto-GCAS)

The objectives of this project are to conduct a longitudinal field study at US Air Force (USAF) bases examining operational F-16 pilots’ trust evolution of Auto-GCAS, and simultaneously identify and document their experiences (e.g., behavior, attitude), concerns (e.g., nuisance or usability concerns persisting over time), and the impact/benefits of the technology (e.g., reported lives/aircraft saved) that emerge during implementation. Results are synthesized to develop recommendations for relevant USAF organizations, provide data that help inform design/development decisions and fielding of the Integrated Collision Avoidance System (ICAS), and develop research questions that form the basis for subsequent studies that help to determine how these automated technologies should be implemented in the USAF.

Simulation Study of Transparency and Trust in the NASA Emergency Landing Planner

The project involved conducting a series of human-in-the-loop simulation studies is to examine the relationship between automation transparency (e.g., how and what kind of information is provided to a human user of an automated system) and users’ (1) trust in the automated system and (2) resulting reliance behaviors using recommendations made by NASA’s Emergency Landing Planner. Results of this study were used to formulate requirements and enhancements for further development of the ACFP.

Perceptions of the Line in the Sky (LIS) System in the F-22

This project involves conducting interviews to examine operational F-22 pilots’ trust evolution of the LIS system, and proactively identifies and documents users’ experience and concerns, including the impact and benefits of the technology emerging throughout implementation. Synthesized results help recommendations for relevant USAF organizations to be developed, further enhancing the LIS system performance while mitigating factors that undermine appropriate trust development. Data help inform future design and development of advanced autonomous and automated safety systems for the USAF.

Required Bandwidth for Ground Control Station Display Supporting UAS Landing

This project involves conducting a part-task simulator experiment determine the minimum required bandwidth for GSC display(s) supporting UAS operators performing landing. The experiment involved pilots flying an MQ-9 and performing an approach under degraded video conditions, consisting of three different frame rate levels and four resolution levels. The study’s results document how degraded video resolution and frame rates affected pilot ability to fly a safe approach and pilot strategies to compensate for degraded resolution and frame rates.

Data Fusion Techniques for the Presentation of Aerial Sensor Information

In order to utilize advances in autonomy to enable a single human operator to manage multiple unmanned vehicles simultaneously, this project developed sensor visualization techniques that allow an operator to process the imagery obtained from multiple vehicles simultaneously and maintain a single global perspective of the operational environment that is independent of any individual sensor’s vantage point. Techniques were developed for consolidating the sensor information from multiple vehicles, geo-referencing all recorded data and presenting it on a single comprehensive terrain database, and presenting it to a single operator in a format that is manageable.

Design and testing of a residential water leak detection system

The project designed a residential water leak detection system that consists of: (a) a functional wireless network architecture that is capable of relaying data from underground to near surface and then to surface (and vice versa), operating on low battery consumption, and transmitting real-time information (leak amount, time, location) to end-users in different formats (e.g., internet, phone, email); (b) innovative algorithms that employs regression-based methods to collect data of actual and simulated leaks to build pattern recognition and classification models that can be used to detect and pinpoint small leaks; (c) a method for fusing multi-sensor data (e.g., flow rate, pressure, temperature, acoustics) in such a way that when used together with the regression technique it allows sensors to be placed far apart, overcoming the much shorter distances required by the widely used cross-correlation technique; and (d) a user-friendly sensor management database and graphical user interface that allow users to place sensors at strategic locations, visualize and analyze leaks and repair history, track sensor locations on a map, and to reconfigure sensor sets needed to respond to operational changes in the environment.

Field Study of the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto-GCAS)

The objectives of this project are to conduct a longitudinal field study at US Air Force (USAF) bases examining operational F-16 pilots’ trust evolution of Auto-GCAS, and simultaneously identify and document their experiences (e.g., behavior, attitude), concerns (e.g., nuisance or usability concerns persisting over time), and the impact/benefits of the technology (e.g., reported lives/aircraft saved) that emerge during implementation. Results are synthesized to develop recommendations for relevant USAF organizations, provide data that help inform design/development decisions and fielding of the Integrated Collision Avoidance System (ICAS), and develop research questions that form the basis for subsequent studies that help to determine how these automated technologies should be implemented in the USAF.

Simulation Study of Transparency and Trust in the NASA Emergency Landing Planner

The project involved conducting a series of human-in-the-loop simulation studies is to examine the relationship between automation transparency (e.g., how and what kind of information is provided to a human user of an automated system) and users’ (1) trust in the automated system and (2) resulting reliance behaviors using recommendations made by NASA’s Emergency Landing Planner. Results of this study were used to formulate requirements and enhancements for further development of the ACFP.

Perceptions of the Line in the Sky (LIS) System in the F-22

This project involves conducting interviews to examine operational F-22 pilots’ trust evolution of the LIS system, and proactively identifies and documents users’ experience and concerns, including the impact and benefits of the technology emerging throughout implementation. Synthesized results help recommendations for relevant USAF organizations to be developed, further enhancing the LIS system performance while mitigating factors that undermine appropriate trust development. Data help inform future design and development of advanced autonomous and automated safety systems for the USAF.

Required Bandwidth for Ground Control Station Display Supporting UAS Landing

This project involves conducting a part-task simulator experiment determine the minimum required bandwidth for GSC display(s) supporting UAS operators performing landing. The experiment involved pilots flying an MQ-9 and performing an approach under degraded video conditions, consisting of three different frame rate levels and four resolution levels. The study’s results document how degraded video resolution and frame rates affected pilot ability to fly a safe approach and pilot strategies to compensate for degraded resolution and frame rates.

Data Fusion Techniques for the Presentation of Aerial Sensor Information

In order to utilize advances in autonomy to enable a single human operator to manage multiple unmanned vehicles simultaneously, this project developed sensor visualization techniques that allow an operator to process the imagery obtained from multiple vehicles simultaneously and maintain a single global perspective of the operational environment that is independent of any individual sensor’s vantage point. Techniques were developed for consolidating the sensor information from multiple vehicles, geo-referencing all recorded data and presenting it on a single comprehensive terrain database, and presenting it to a single operator in a format that is manageable.

Design and Testing of a Residential Water Leak Detection System

The project designed a residential water leak detection system that consists of: (a) a functional wireless network architecture that is capable of relaying data from underground to near surface and then to surface (and vice versa), operating on low battery consumption, and transmitting real-time information (leak amount, time, location) to end-users in different formats (e.g., internet, phone, email); (b) innovative algorithms that employs regression-based methods to collect data of actual and simulated leaks to build pattern recognition and classification models that can be used to detect and pinpoint small leaks; (c) a method for fusing multi-sensor data (e.g., flow rate, pressure, temperature, acoustics) in such a way that when used together with the regression technique it allows sensors to be placed far apart, overcoming the much shorter distances required by the widely used cross-correlation technique; and (d) a user-friendly sensor management database and graphical user interface that allow users to place sensors at strategic locations, visualize and analyze leaks and repair history, track sensor locations on a map, and to reconfigure sensor sets needed to respond to operational changes in the environment.

PUBLICATIONS

Hoffmann, L. C., Van Abel, A., Ho, N. T., Sadler, G. G., Lyons, J. B., Fergueson, W. E., Grigsby, M., & Wilkins, M. A. (under review). Technology acceptance recommendations from a transtheoretical model of change: Analysis of the Air-Force F-16 Auto-GCAS.

Ho, N. T., Sadler, G. G., Hoffmann, L. C., Lyons, J. B., & Johnson, W. (2017). Trust of a military automated system in an operational context. Military Psychology, in press.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/mil0000189

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Van Abel, A., Hoffmann, L. C., Sadler, G. G., Fergueson, W. E., Grigsby, M., & Wilkins, M. A. (2017). Comparing trust in Auto-GCAS between experienced and novice Air Force pilots. Ergonomics in Design, in press.
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1064804617716612

Ho, N. T., Sadler, G. G., Hoffmann, L. C., Zemlicka, K., Lyons, J. B., Fergueson, W. E., Richardson, C., Cacanindin, A., Cals, S., & Wilkins, M. A. (2017). A longitudinal field study of Auto-GCAS acceptance and trust: First year results and implications. Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, in press.
https://doi.org/10.1177/1555343417701019

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Van Abel, A., Hoffmann, L. C., Fergueson, W. E., Sadler, G. G., Grigsby, M., & Burns, A. (2017). Exploring Trust Barriers to Future Autonomy: A Qualitative Look. 8th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, Los Angeles, CA, July 17 – 21.
https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-60591-3_1

Sadler, G. G., Battiste, H., Ho, N. T., Hoffmann, L. C., Lyons, J. B., Johnson, W., & Shively, J. (2016). Effects of Transparency on Pilot Trust and Agreement in the Autonomous Constrained Flight Planner. 35th Digital Avionics Systems Conference, Sacramento, CA, September 25 – 29.
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7777998/

Lyons, J. B., Sadler, G. G., Battiste, H., Koltai, K., Ho, N. T., Hoffmann, L. C., Johnson, W., & Shively, J. (2016). Shaping Trust through Transparent Design: Theoretical and Experimental Guidelines. 7th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, Orlando, FL, July 27 – 31.
https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-41959-6_11

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Fergueson, W. E., Sadler, G. G., Cals, S., Richardson, C., & Wilkins, M. A. (2016). Trust of an automatic ground collision avoidance technology: A fighter pilot perspective. Military Psychology, 28(4), 271-277. 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/mil0000124

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Koltai, K., Masequesmay, G., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., & Johnson, W. (2016). A Trust-based analysis of an Air Force collision avoidance system: Test pilots. Ergonomics in Design, 24(1), 9-12.
https://doi.org/10.1177/1064804615611274
.

Lyons, J. B., Koltai, K., Ho, N. T., Johnson, W., Smith, D., & Shively, J., (2016). Engineering Trust in Complex Automated Systems. Ergonomics in Design, 24(1), 13-17.
https://doi.org/10.1177/1064804615611272

Ho, N. T., Koltai, K., Masequesmay, G., Cals, S., Sadler, G. G., Lyons, J. B., Cacanindin, A., Johnson, W., & Skoog, M. (2015). An Ethnographic-Based Model for Trust Development in Auto-GCAS. American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Toronto, Canada, August 6 – 9.

Koltai, K., Ho, N. T, Masequesmay, G., Niedober, D., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., Johnson, W., & Lyons, J. B. (2014). Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Capability on Human Automation Trust: A Case Study of Auto-GCAS Experimental Test Pilots. International Conference on Human Computer Interaction in Aerospace, Santa Clara, CA, July 30 – August 1.
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140011822.pdf

Niedober, D., Ho, N. T., Koltai, K., Masequesmay, G., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., Johnson, W., & Lyons, J. B. (2014). Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Capability Factors on Human-Automation Trust: A Case Study of Auto-GCAS Engineers. HCII Conference, Crete, Greece, June 22 – 27.
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07227-2_45

Koltai, K., Ho, N. T., Masequesmay, G., Niedober, D., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., Johnson, W., & Lyons, J. B. (2014). An Extended Case Study Methodology for Investigating Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Factors on Human-Automation Trust. Proceedings of the ACM-CHI Conference, Toronto, Canada, April 26 – May 1.
https://human-factors.arc.nasa.gov/publications/Koltai_etal_2014.pdf

 

PUBLICATIONS

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Fergueson, W. E., Sadler, G. G., Cals, S., Richardson, C., & Wilkins, M. A. (2016). Trust of an automatic ground collision avoidance technology: A fighter pilot perspective. Military Psychology, 28 (4), 271-277. 

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Koltai, K., Masequesmay, G., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., & Johnson, W. (2016). A Trust-based analysis of an Air Force collision avoidance system: Test pilots. Ergonomics in Design, 24 (1), 9-12

Lyons, J. B., Koltai, K., Ho, N. T., Johnson, W., Smith, D., & Shively, J., (2016). Engineering Trust in Complex Automated Systems. Ergonomics in Design, 24 (1), 13-17

Ho, N. T., Koltai, K., Masequesmay, G., Cals, S., Sadler, G. G., Lyons, J. B., Cacanindin, A., Johnson, W., & Skoog, M. (2015). An Ethnographic-Based Model for Trust Development in Auto-GCAS. American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Toronto, Canada, August 6 – 9.

Koltai, K., Ho, N. T, Masequesmay, G., Niedober, D., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., Johnson, W., & Lyons, J. B. (2014). Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Capability on Human Automation Trust: A Case Study of Auto-GCAS Experimental Test Pilots. International Conference on Human Computer Interaction in Aerospace, Santa Clara, CA, July 30 – August Niedober, D.,

Ho, N. T., Koltai, K., Masequesmay, G., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., Johnson, W., & Lyons, J. B. (2014). Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Capability Factors on Human-Automation Trust: A Case Study of Auto-GCAS Engineers. HCII Conference, Crete, Greece, June 22 – 27.

Koltai, K., Ho, N. T., Masequesmay, G., Niedober, D., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., Johnson, W., & Lyons, J. B. (2014). An Extended Case Study Methodology for Investigating Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Factors on Human-Automation Trust. Proceedings of the ACM-CHI Conference, Toronto, Canada, April 26 – May 1.

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Van Abel, A. L., Hoffmann, L. C., Sadler, G. G., Fergueson, W. E., Grigsby,M. A., Wilkins, M. (in press). A trust-based analysis of an Air Force collision avoidance system: Experienced versus novice pilots. Ergonomics in Design.

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Van Abel, A. L., Hoffmann, L. C., Fergueson, W. E., Sadler, G. G., Grigsby,M. A., Burns, A. C. (in press). Exploring trust barriers to future autonomy: A qualitative look. Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics.

Ho, N. T., Sadler, G. G., Hoffmann, L. C., Zemlicka, K., Lyons, J. B., Fergueson, W. E., Richardson, C., Cacanindin, A. G., Cals, S. B., Wilkins, M. A. (under review). A longitudinal field study of Auto-GCAS acceptance and trust: First year results and implications. Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making.

Ho, N. T., Sadler, G. G., Hoffmann, L. C., Lyons, J. B., & Johnson, W. W. (under review). Trust of a military automated system in an operational context. Military Psychology.

Sadler, G. G., Ho, N. T., Battiste, H., Hoffmann, L. C., Lyons, J. B., Johnson, W., Shively, R., Smith, D. (2016). Effects of transparency on pilot trust and agreement in the autonomous constrained flight planner. IEEE/AIAA Digital Avionics Systems Conference (DASC), 35th, Sacramento, CA.

Lyons, J. B., Sadler, G. G., Koltai, K., Battiste, H., Ho, N. T., Hoffmann, L. C., . . . Shively, R. (2016). Shaping trust through transparent design: Theoretical and experimental guidelines. In P. Savage-Knepshield & J. Y. Chen (Eds.), Advances in Human Factors in Robots and Unmanned Systems: Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference on Human Factors in Robots and Unmanned Systems, July 27-31, 2016, Orlando, Florida (pp. 127–136): Springer International Publishing.

Lyons, J. B., Koltai, K. S., Ho, N. T., Johnson, W. B., Smith, D. E., & Shively, R. J. (2016). Engineering trust in complex automated systems. Ergonomics in Design, 24, 13–17

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Koltai, K., Masequesmay, G., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A. & Johnson, W. (2016). A trust-based analysis of an Air Force collision avoidance system: Test pilots. Ergonomics in Design, 24(1).

Ho, N. T., Lyons, J. B., Hoffmann, L. C., Sadler, G. G., Van Abel, A., Fergueson, W. E., Grigsby, M., Wilkins, M. A., Webb, C., Marschik, D., Allamandola, D. K., & Cacanindin, A. (in prep). Human factors of LIS AGCAS: Pilot perceptions and trust implications from testing to early field implementation.

Sadler, G. G., Ho, N. T., Hoffmann, L. C., Zemlicka, K., Lyons, J. B., & Fosher, K. (in prep). Assisting the improvement of a military safety system: An application of rapid assessment procedures to the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System.

Hoffmann, L. C., Van Abel, A., Ho, N. T., Sadler, G. G., Lyons, J. B., Fergueson, W. E., Grigsby, M., & Wilkins, M. A. (under review). Technology acceptance recommendations from a transtheoretical model of change: Analysis of the Air-Force F-16 Auto-GCS.

Ho, N. T., Sadler, G. G., Hoffmann, L. C., Lyons, J. B., & Johnson, W. (under review). Trust of a military automated system in an operational context.

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Van Abel, A., Hoffmann, L. C., Sadler, G. G., Fergueson, W. E., Grigsby, M., & Wilkins, M. A. (2017; in press). A Trust-based analysis of an Air Force collision avoidance system: Experienced versus novice pilots. Ergonomics in Design, XX(X), x-x.

Ho, N. T., Sadler, G. G., Hoffmann, L. C., Zemlicka, K., Lyons, J. B., Fergueson, W. E., Richardson, C., Cacanindin, A., Cals, S., & Wilkins, M. A. (2017; in press). A longitudinal field study of Auto-GCAS acceptance and trust: First year results and implications. Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, XX(X), x-x.

Niedober, D. J., Ho, N. T., Masequesmay, G., Koltai, K., Skoog, M., Cacanindin, A., Lyons, J. B. (2014). Influence of cultural, organizational and automation factors on human-automation trust: A case study of Auto-GCAS engineers and developmental history. In M. Kurosu (Ed.), Human-Computer Interaction. Applications and Services, 8512, (pp. 473-484): Springer International Publishing

Koltai, K., Ho, N. T., Masequesmay, G., Niedober, D., Skoog, M., Johnson, W., Lyons, J. B. (2014a). An extended case study methodology for investigating influence of cultural, organizational, and automation factors on human-automation trust. ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Toronto, Canada

Lyons, J. B., Ho, N. T., Van Abel, A., Hoffmann, L. C., Fergueson, W. E., Sadler, G. G., Grigsby, M., & Burns, A. (2017). Exploring Trust Barriers to Future Autonomy: A Qualitative Look. 8th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, Los Angeles, CA, July 17 – 21.

Sadler, G. G., Battiste, H., Ho, N. T., Hoffmann, L. C., Lyons, J. B., Johnson, W., & Shively, J. (2016). Effects of Transparency on Pilot Trust and Agreement in the Autonomous Constrained Flight Planner. 35th Digital Avionics Systems Conference, Sacramento, CA, September 25 – 29.Lyons, J. B., Sadler, G. G., Battiste, H., Koltai, K.,

Ho, N. T., Hoffmann, L. C., Johnson, W., & Shively, J. (2016). Shaping Trust through Transparent Design: Theoretical and Experimental Guidelines7th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, Orlando, FL, July 27 – 31

CONTACT

NVH Human Systems Integration LLC

Address

20944 Sherman Way, Suite 210,

Canoga Park, CA 91303

Phone 747-226-3633